MTCC

World2 (1)

Educational trends in your areas of teaching expertise

Today’s students deserve an education that meets their individual needs and provides opportunities that connect them on a global scale. The Technological, Pedagogical, Content Knowledge (TPACK) theoretical framework explores the interrelatedness and complex interaction of these three domains in teaching, which intersect to create a “sweet spot” where learning becomes more exciting, creative, challenging and rewarding. In such an environment, learners are in touch with authentic situations to explore, observe, investigate, create and solve problems. Students will begin to take ownership and move towards self-directed learning. This is the foundation for the growth of curiosity and passion for learning and is the basis for developing life-long learners and the ability to adapt in our rapidly changing global world.

At Our Lady of the Cape Primary School, and indeed in all schools interested in preparing students for the 21st Century and beyond, the role of teachers has shifted from being a subject matter expert who simply transmits information to students, to one who increasingly acts as a facilitator of student learning. They need to encourage and show students how to think critically and how to learn by doing, acting as a resource while their students discover and master new concepts. Teachers need to teach the fundamentals and then create the culture in their classrooms for innovation to occur, allowing their students to become:

  • Critical thinkers;
  • Problem solvers;
  • Good communicators;
  • Good collaborators;
  • Information and technology literate;
  • Flexible and adaptable;
  • Innovative and creative; and
  • Globally competent.

These competences are key aspects of innovation. Innovation must be part of the educational process, not an optional extra! In the classroom, this corresponds neatly with the stages of Project-Based Learning (PBL). In PBL, students investigate intriguing questions that lead them to learn important academic content. Content is at the centre of the learning experience, and must be strongly supported with digital technologies and innovation. Students apply their learning to create something new, demonstrate their understanding, or teach others about the issue they have explored. By embracing key thinking skills of the PBL process, teachers can guide students to operate in the same way that innovators do, in all kinds of settings. This is what brings a dimension of ‘practicality’ or ‘real-life’ to otherwise theoretical learning.

Throughout my fulltime classroom teaching career and my principalship, during which time I have almost always carried a teaching load, I consider myself to be an exemplary classroom practitioner. I see it as essential to be at the ‘coal face’ of the classroom in order to keep abreast of current educational research, maintain best practice and remain fluent with ever changing content. I have modelled lessons to classroom teachers, provided DOTT relief lessons and relief days for teachers across the school. As part of providing DOTT relief, I have been responsible for subject areas in their entirety, predominately in the areas of Information Technology, Society and Environment (History), Science, Religion, Maths and English.

I find ICT personally stimulating and I am fluent in the use of digital media and proficient in its use in the classroom context. While studying at Michigan and Kansas Universities I explored the practical approaches of innovative digital technologies and their application in classrooms such as Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, Flipped Classrooms, 3D Printing, Games and Gamification, Online Simulations, Mobile Learning, Digital Online Learning, Blogs, Coding, Learning Analytics and the impact of Social Media in education. I use Microsoft programs such as Word, Excel, Publisher and Outlook proficiently along with a variety of other software packages. I have a good working knowledge of Google Docs and its associated applications. I am fluent in the use of WordPress, SEQTA and MAZE.

Catering for individual differences and mixed ability groups

I have always maintained in my classrooms, the expectation that all students will learn at a level that is challenging and rewarding to each one individually. Good teaching is how this is achieved. This includes motivating students and also teaching and guiding them in how to learn, making learning relevant, meaningful, and memorable. It is about listening, questioning, being responsive, and remembering that each student and each class is unique, and each student and each class will learn differently. It is the role of the teacher to find the key that inspires individual students and classes. It is about encouraging students to excel and at the same time, it is about being human, respecting others, and being professional at all times. Good teaching requires focused instruction on specific curriculum content and connection to the prior knowledge and skills of individual student’s. It establishes and maintains clear learning goals and expectations for each student in each lesson as well as allowing for immediate and reflective feedback. And finally, good teaching is about having fun! I always endeavour to provide focused and explicit teaching within all my lessons, mixing it with enjoyment, practicality and fostering a desire to learn.

By maintaining high expectations, providing appropriate scaffolding and with a strong ability to motivate, I encourage all students to believe in themselves and to reach for their potential. I strive to create an atmosphere within my classrooms of questioning, curiosity and innovative thinking. By employing best practice within my classrooms I believe that students are empowered to become self-directed in their learning. Through modelling and demonstration, I show students how to become problem solvers with the intention that they are able to continue to learn and progress increasingly independently. I believe that self-motivated, innovative learning is the key to developing 21st Century fluency and life-long learners, who can embrace their rapidly changing world with competence and confidence.

When catering for individual student differences within the classroom it is imperative that teachers are mindful of the three principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL).

  • Multiple means of representation – providing learners with various ways to acquire knowledge and information.
  • Multiple means of expression – providing learners with alternatives to demonstrate what they know and what and how they think.
  • Multiple means of engagement – providing learners with appropriate means of engaging and interacting with the learning environment.

These three principles and techniques will create inclusive classroom instruction and accessible learning materials for all students within the classroom. I am a strong advocate of the core belief of UDL: that all students will benefit when they are given multiples ways to take in new information, express their comprehension, and become engaged in learning.

The goal of education in the 21st Century is not simply the mastery of knowledge. It is the mastery of learning. Education should help turn novice learners into expert learners -individuals who know how to learn, who want to learn, and who, in their own highly individual ways, are well prepared for a lifetime of learning. Universal Design for Learning is an approach that addresses and redresses the primary barrier to making expert learners of all students: inflexible, one-size-fits-all curricula that raise unintentional barriers to learning. Learners with disabilities are most vulnerable to such barriers, but many students without disabilities also find that curricula are poorly designed to meet their learning needs.

Interpersonal skills which promote positive interaction with students, parents and teaching colleagues

This has been a daily and a vital part of my role as Principal duties in maintaining a cohesive and well-functioning staff and school community. I find it critically important for staff, students and parents to find ways of relating and functioning that keep the focus of our educational, organisational and relational goals at the forefront of all decisions whilst engaging with one another to understand the viewpoint of others in our community.

Being a Principal has provided me the opportunity to work with a wide variety of people and through this I have developed an assortment of skills which enable me to handle a variety of issues ranging from complex to routine. Few important administrative tasks are either conducted or implemented without interaction with others. Therefore effective and informative communication is essential between staff, students, parents, parish priest, School Board and the wider community. I endeavour to acknowledge the opinions of all people involved in the education process and keep all parties well informed, in a timely manner.

It is essential to provide enriching experiences and growth opportunities for staff (which will flow on to students) in order to inspire and develop innovation. I have always employed a ‘people-first’ strategy which has had a profound effect on staff morale and which has always resulted in a flow-on effect of staff members nurturing one another and the students in their care. A ‘people-first’ strategy with students, allows students to feel valued as an individual, recognising their own particular gifts and talents. It allows them to also value the individuality of others and to work together constructively. Focusing on the individual provides a path to a high level of engagement and a profound attitude of support and collaboration across the school. Valuing people as individuals and Pastoral Care is one of the strengths of my leadership.

Mastering new skills, learning and self-discovery are powerful agents of enrichment. I believe that a crucial aspect of leadership is establishing what people aspire to, helping them to achieve it and then using it for the benefit of the school community. This simple idea has the power to energise a school! It acknowledges individual differences, provides for rich learning opportunities and allows for the passions and the talents of individuals to be shared for the benefit of the community. Apart from the obvious opportunities this provides throughout the school, it is a most effective means of motivation and generates a passion for learning in staff, students and parents.

Demonstrated success as a dynamic, innovative and reflective teaching practitioner who strives for excellence

Today’s students deserve an education that meets their individual needs and provides opportunities that connect them on a global scale. The Technological, Pedagogical, Content Knowledge (TPACK) theoretical framework explores the interrelatedness and complex interaction of these three domains in teaching and learning, which intersect to create a “sweet spot” where learning becomes more exciting, creative, challenging and rewarding. In such an environment, learners are in touch with authentic situations to explore, observe, investigate, create and solve problems. Students will begin to take ownership and move towards self-directed learning. This is the foundation for the growth of curiosity and passion for learning and is the basis for developing life-long learners and the ability to adapt in our rapidly changing global world.

Throughout my fulltime classroom teaching career and my principalship, during which time I have almost always carried a teaching load, I have always considered myself to be an exemplary classroom practitioner. I see it as essential to be at the ‘coal face’ of the classroom in order to keep abreast of current educational research, maintain best practice and remain fluent with ever changing content. I have modelled lessons to classroom teachers, provided DOTT relief lessons and relief days for teachers across the school. As part of providing DOTT relief, I have been responsible for subject areas in their entirety, predominately in the areas of Information Technology, Society and Environment (History), Science, Religion, Maths and English.  I have always maintained in my classrooms, the expectation that all students will learn at a level that is challenging and rewarding to each one individually.

By maintaining high expectations, providing appropriate scaffolding and with the ability to motivate, I encourage all students to believe in themselves and reach their potential. I have strived to create an atmosphere within my classrooms of questioning, curiosity and innovative thinking. By employing best practice within my classrooms I believe that students are empowered to become self-directed in their learning. Through modelling and demonstration, I show students how to become problem solvers with the intention that they are able to continue to learn and progress increasingly independently. I believe that self-motivated, innovative learning is the key to developing 21st Century fluency and life-long learners, who can embrace their rapidly changing world with competence and confidence.

At Our Lady of the Cape Primary School, and indeed in all schools interested in preparing students for the 21st Century and beyond, the role of teachers has shifted from being a subject matter expert who simply transmits information to students, to one of acting as a facilitator of student learning. It is my belief and goal that teachers create a culture that develops student capabilities in problem solving, teamwork, learning to learn and reflective thinking. In the classroom, this process corresponds neatly with the stages of project-based learning (PBL). In PBL, students investigate intriguing questions that lead them to learn important academic content. They apply their learning to create something new, demonstrate their understanding, or teach others about the issue they have explored. By embracing key thinking skills of the PBL process, teachers can guide students to operate in the same way that innovators do in all kinds of settings.

Highly developed organisational and interpersonal skills with a successful record of developing positive relationships with students, staff, parents and parish

 This has been a daily and a vital part of my role as Principal duties in maintaining a cohesive and well-functioning staff and school community. I find it critically important for staff, students and parents to find ways of relating and functioning that keep the focus of our educational, organisational and relational goals at the forefront of all decisions whilst engaging with one another to understand the viewpoint of others in our community.

Being a Principal has provided me the opportunity to work with a wide variety of people and through this I have developed an assortment of skills which enable me to handle a variety of issues ranging from complex to routine. Few important administrative tasks are either conducted or implemented without interaction with others. Therefore effective and informative communication is essential between staff, students, parents, parish priest, School Board and the wider community. I endeavour to acknowledge the opinions of all people involved in the education process and keep all parties well informed, in a timely manner.

It is essential to provide enriching experiences and growth opportunities for staff (which will flow on to students) in order to inspire and develop innovation. I have always employed a ‘people-first’ strategy which has had a profound effect on staff morale and which has always resulted in a flow-on effect of staff members nurturing one another and the students in their classrooms. Focusing on the individual provides a path to a high level of engagement and a profound attitude of support and collaboration in the school. Pastoral Care is my strength.

Mastering new skills, learning and self-discovery are powerful agents of enrichment. I believe that a crucial aspect of leadership is establishing what people aspire to, helping them to achieve it and then using it for the benefit of the school community. This simple idea has the power to energise a school! It acknowledges individual differences, provides for rich learning opportunities and allows for the passions and the talents of individuals to be shared for the benefit of the community. Apart from the obvious opportunities this provides throughout the school, it is a most effective means of motivation and generates a passion for learning.

 

Sound knowledge of current educational theories and practices and proven ability to both drive educational change and lead staff in professional learning

 In my current role it has been essential to have a sound knowledge of current educational theories and practices in all curriculum areas to assist my staff with their continual development and to implement the best pedagogy available for the benefit of our students’ education. Personally, I have a particular interest in the use of technology and how this can enhance student achievement across all areas. This is an area we are currently investigating in an attempt to continue to improve the use of iPads within the school.

As part of our school improvement process during the past few years we have had a major focus on Literacy and Numeracy. All staff have received professional development in these areas with professional reading a key component associated with all PLC meetings. Some of the specific areas that we have focused on are:

  • Alignment of curriculum, pedagogy and asses
  • Evidence-based decision making.
  • Combining performance data and validated research to inform agreed teaching methods for teaching and learning.
  • Agreed feedback practices for staff, parents and students.
  • Targeted and scaffolded instruction.
  • Comprehensive range of agreed contemporary teaching strategies that support curriculum.
  • Differentiated and scaffolded teaching based on identified needs of students.
  • Safe, supportive, connected and inclusive learning environments.

I have always provided the environment, assistance and professional development for the teachers to be comfortable in the use of technology within their classrooms. This in turn has resulted in the teachers creating an environment for their students to become innovative learners. In creating this culture, I have:

  • Provided professional development for the staff in the area of ICT.
  • Led professional development in the areas of:
  • Australian Curriculum implementation
  • Reporting standards/levels within the school
  • AITSL Teacher Standards
  • iPads in Education
  • Administered questionnaires to staff, students and parents seeking feedback and direction for future endeavours.
  • Implemented a 1:1 iPad (parent funded) programme in Years 4 to 7. Our Lady of the Cape became a focus school for teachers to visit, to view and to experience the iPad programme.
  • Introduced an ICT Specialist, Lego Robotics and Gifted And Talented Education (GATE) Programme.
  • Provided and led professional development of SEQTA in the areas of:
  • Student data reports
  • Student Absentees
  • Pastoral Care
  • IEP’s & CAP’s

“If we teach today’s students as we taught yesterday’s, we rob them of tomorrow.” (John Dewey). I believe that it is critical to move with current theory and practice and that necessitates embracing technologies. Innovative learning is what teaches our students adaptability in a rapidly changing world. We must lead our teachers and our students towards innovation or we are robbing them of the competencies that will allow them to flourish in the global world in which they need to function.

 

Willingness to work in a flexible and creative way

My leadership has always been characterised by encouraging my staff to try new things, experimenting and exploring with the vision of providing the best education for our students. I believe that ‘because we have always done it this way’, is possibly the most dangerous phrase in the English language! If we can do something differently that shows potential to be better for our students, then we need to explore that option. I demonstrate a willingness to take risks in my own practice as a crucial element of leadership. I have tried to model this by creating environments where I do not micromanage, but push people to think outside of the box, pushing for the development of better ideas. I believe that when you give staff the license to take risks it can lead to amazing things. This is akin to Google’s ‘20% Time’ where staff are encouraged to think innovatively.

I have always been open to creating a work environment that is flexible and creative. I believe that this is essential in working with the staff and students of today, as the landscape is ever changing. We as leaders need to adapt and move with the times in order to provide the best education for our students and to best support our staff in implementing this education.

Demonstrated expertise in ICT and proficiency in integrating its applications in the daily classroom environment

 Today’s students deserve an education that meets their individual needs and provides opportunities that connect them on a global scale. Being an educator in a 21st Century environment can be quite a daunting responsibility. Teachers today have to learn to effectively balance the expanding roles they are being asked to fill within their classrooms, especially with the explosion of recent digital technologies into the curriculum. Teachers must make this leap and incorporate technology and 21st Century fluencies into their daily lessons, and in doing so they need to learn new technologies in order to keep current with students who are well versed and proficient with technologies. This, for some teachers, involves a major mind-shift and can be an overwhelming experience. In addition to all the emerging technologies, more than ever before, teachers are expected to be facilitators of learning rather simply providers of knowledge. They need to encourage and show students how to think critically and how learn by doing, acting as a resource while their students discover and master new concepts. They need to teach the fundamentals and then create the culture in their classrooms for innovation to occur, allowing their students to become:

  • Critical thinkers;
  • Problem solvers;
  • Good communicators;
  • Good collaborators;
  • Information and technology literate;
  • Flexible and adaptable;
  • Innovative and creative; and
  • Globally competent.

I believe that my expertise in integrating ICT into daily classroom practice lies in in-depth knowledge of the subject areas, a sound grasp of how students learn content and an understanding of classroom environments that optimise learning. I have outstanding ICT skills and have accessed ongoing, high quality professional learning opportunities to develop and enhance the skills and knowledge necessary to provide for best teaching practice. On top of all of this I have constantly sought improvement of my own teaching practice as well as instilling in my staff the value of continuous learning, encouraging them to increasingly reach for higher levels of performance. I believe that to be an effective school leader, I need to know how effective professional learning can be put into operation as part of an overall strategy for school improvement. Participating in meaningful professional learning and feedback is the key to ensuring that schools become learning communities where teachers work together, learn from each other and share best practice on effective teaching and learning.

Creativity and problem solving along with a classroom atmosphere of questioning, curiosity and innovative thinking have been hallmarks of my teaching career. I see this as essential in developing the 21st Century fluencies with all students, both for today and for the future into which our students will emerge. This necessitates using digital technologies and ‘real-life learning’, making the education we provide relevant, practical and motivating.

I believe that it is important to explore real-life issues, to think creatively and to generate solutions to diverse problems. This allows students global connectivity, collaborative learning, thinking in ‘different ways’, learning open-mindedness, opportunities that develop a range of literacies, growth in independent learning skills, development in social and emotional competence and growing spiritually awareness. These are key aspects of innovation.

While studying at Michigan and Kansas I explored the practical approaches of innovative digital technologies and their application in classrooms such as Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality, Flipped Classrooms, 3D Printing, Games and Gamification, Online Simulations, Mobile Learning, Digital Online Learning, Blogs, Coding, Learning Analytics and the impact of Social Media in education.

Demonstrated enthusiasm and initiative as a school leader

 A good leader needs to inspire and value his/her staff and motivate them to be even better teachers. A teacher who knows they are valued, maintains a positive attitude and is motivated will become a teacher that students and staff will enjoy learning from, working with and being around. This attitude has the power to bring out true greatness in themselves, their peers and their students.

I believe that leadership is establishing what people aspire to, helping them to achieve it and then using it for the benefit of the school community. This recognises the individual strengths of staff members, nurtures developing qualities and fosters an environment of collaboration and teamwork. I try to maintain a holistic approach to education where staff, students and parents work collaboratively to foster the academic, spiritual and social development of the students. All play a vital role in the learning process.

Creative learning requires innovative teaching. Innovative teaching is both the practice of teaching for creativity and of applying innovation to teaching. Innovation and creativity springs from the freedom to connect ideas in new ways. Our schools and universities generally allow us to connect ideas only in prescribed ways – sometimes these lead to new insights, but more likely they lead to rote learning. We need schools and universities to be places where innovation happens routinely.

With this in mind in my current role, I have to be constantly on the lookout for new and innovative ways to provide the best education for our students. I have been instrumental in introducing the following into Our Lady of the Cape Primary School:

  • Implemented a 1:1 iPad programme in Years 4 to 7.
  • Our Lady of the Cape became a focus school for teachers to visit, to view and to experience the iPad programme in classrooms.
  • Employed an ICT Specialist.
  • Lego Robotics.
  • Gifted And Talented Education (GATE) Programme.
  • Effected Flexible learning Spaces in all classrooms.

 Have a clear understanding of the Australian Professional Standards for Teachers

 In my current role it has been essential to have a good working knowledge of the AITSL standards. A whole staff approach has been developed using a ‘Personal Growth Plan’ for the teaching staff. I also meet with staff members individually on a regular basis to discuss daily teaching practices and to plan with that staff member for his/her future professional growth and professional development.

“When school leaders and teachers believe they can make a difference…they make a difference.” There is indisputable evidence that the quality of teaching is the most significant factor affecting students and their outcomes. I see this as extremely important factor affecting the student outcomes in my school. Within my school we looked at the three components of the Development Framework;

  • Reflection and goal setting
  • Professional practice and learning
  • Feedback and review.

Keeping these in mind, I revised the staff appraisal system to allow for greater appraisal and feedback, not only from the leadership team but also from peers, leading to targeted development and improved teacher performance.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUALIFICATIONS:

 

Year Institution Qualifications Major area/s Study
2015 Michigan State University

USA

Master of Arts in Educational Technology (Graduate Certificate of Educational Technology) Information Technology
2015 Kansas University

USA

Integration of Educational Technology K-12 Information Technology
2002 – 2007 Notre Dame University

Western Australia

Master of Religious

Education

Religious Education
2002 Catholic Education Office Accreditation C Religious Education
2001 Curtin University Graduate Certificate

in Information Technology

Information Technology
1993 – 1995 Edith Cowan University Bachelor of Education  

Information Technology

 

1991 Catholic Education Office Accreditation A & B Religious Education
1988 – 1990 Australian Catholic

University (Signadou  Campus)

Diploma of Teaching

(Primary)

Religious Education

&

Science

OTHER QUALIFICATIONS:

  • Accreditation for Leadership of a Catholic School Community.
  • Accreditation for Leadership of the Religious Education Learning Area.
  • Accreditation to Teach Religious Education.
  • St John Ambulance Senior First Aid Certificate.
  • Occupational Safety and Health Officer.
  • Certificate of Cartography.
  • Land and Engineering Survey Drafting.

 

Working with Children Check number:  1303852                 Exp. 21 April 2016

TRBWA number:                                 32018799               Exp. 14 December 2015

PROFESIONAL DEVELOPMENT:

 

Date Course
2014 21st Century Learner Fluency Project – Lee Crockett
2014 iPads in Education Professional Development – Apple
2014 Formulating School Quality Improvement Plan – Trish Jackson
2014 Fullness of Life – Fr Tony Chiera
2014 AITSL Teaching Standards – CEO
2014 AITSL Performance and Development Workshop – CEO
2014 iPads Professional Development – Apple
2014 Open Investigations & Australian Curriculum (PP-Y7) – Scitech
2013 Inspiring Global leadership – Dr Yong Zhao
2013 School Charism – Sr Christine Clarke
2013 Working From the Heart In Complex Times – Brendan Spillane
2013 Conflict Resolution – Mary Power
2013 Managing a Digital Primary School – Dr Peter Carey – CEO
2013 Dancing with the 21st Century learner: Leading contemporary pedagogy and student learning – Lee Crockett
2013 Apple iPads in the Classroom: Exploring digital content in the classroom
2013 Western Australian Curriculum and Assessment Outline
2013 CPPA Conference
2013 Boys in Education – Ian Lillico
2013 Curriculum Organiser – Robin Clarke
2013 National Quality Standards Assessor Training
2013 APPA Conference – Cairns QLD
2013 Cybersafety (3 days) – Susan McLean
2013 EduTech ICT Congress – Brisbane
2013 21st Century Learner Master Class – Ian Jukes
2013 From Charity to Social Justice – Janeen Murphy
2012 Crisis Management Planning – CEO
2012 Making Jesus Real – Narrogin
2012 Leading Change for Increased Student Achievement
2012 Building Sustainable Leadership in Educational Settings
2012 The Australian Curriculum and the Early Years Learning Framework
2012 National Quality Standards
2012 Kids Matter Primary Professional Development
2012 Apple Learning Tour – Engage students with iPads in education.
2012 Delivering Grammar in the Australian Curriculum – PETAA
2012 Seeking God within the “Busyness” of School Life – Fr Tony Chiera
2012 The Australian Curriculum and the EYLF in the Early Years – Trish Jackson
2012 Implementing the Australian Curriculum
2012 Same Page, Different Book – Brendan Spillane
2011 The Catholic Church in the Year 2011: Traditional Teachings in Modern Society – Fr Tony Chiera
2011 Students With Disability – Sheryl Hunter
2011 Developing a Numeracy Programme – Dr Paul Swan
2011 Performance Management
2011 Autism Spectrum in Primary Schools – Sheryl Hunter
2011 Seven Habits of Highly Effective People – Trish Walsh
2011 Aboriginal Reconciliation Policy Development – Leon Ridgeway
2010 Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (PATHS) PD – Helen Thomson
2010 Peace at Any Cost – Norma Woodcock
2010 APPA National Conference – Balancing Primary Leadership

Advertisements